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See which Tulane professor made TIME’s most influential people list

April 20, 2018 3:45 PM
 | 
Carolyn Scofield cscofiel@tulane.edu
  

 

 

Video transcript:

A Tulane author earns major recognition for her work and new Tulane research could have profound implications on the Louisiana coast. That’s all part of this week’s Tulane News in Review.

Tulane associate professor of creative writing Jesmyn Ward has been named to TIME magazine’s list of the 100 most influential people. Described as a “modern-day William Faulkner,” Ward is a two-time National Book Award winner and recipient of a MacArthur Foundation genius grant.

Also in TIME’s 100 most influential list, professor Walter Isaacson wrote a profile for Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella. 

NewsmaxMSNDrugs.com and more picked up Tulane epidemiologist Dr. Lu Qi’s study on tooth loss and its link to heart disease.

A new Tulane study led by epidemiologist Alessandra Bazzano found third-graders with anxiety benefitted from doing yoga or meditation in the classroom. ForbesDrugs.comHealth Day and more had the story.  

Tulane sociologist David Smilde was quoted by the New York TimesThe Hill and AFP

Tulane researchers found seas are rising too fast to save a lot of the Mississippi River delta through sediment diversions. Lead author Elizabeth Chamberlain, who earned a PhD from the Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, and geologist Tor Tornqvist recently published the study. It was covered by The Washington PostMSN, and Science Daily

Assistant professor of history Karissa Haugeberg talked to Maclean’s about the roots of the nation’s pro-life movement. 

U.S. News & World Report reached out to Tulane director of Admission Jeff Schiffman for advice about how parents should help their kids choose which college to attend.

Pacific Standard quoted Tulane psychiatrist Dr. Mary Margaret Gleason in a story about young children taking psychotropic drugs like Prozac.

Finally, Mashable spoke with Tulane anthropologist Trenton Holliday about the discovery of an ancient finger that’s changing what scientist think about when humans began spreading out across the globe.

That’s all for this Tulane News in Review. Roll Wave!