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Tulane professor honored for contributions to architectural education

February 02, 2018 11:45 AM
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Judith Kinnard, FAIA, professor of architecture and Harvey-Wadsworth Chair of Landscape Urbanism, was recently named a Distinguished Professor by the American Association of Collegiate Schools of Architecture. (Photo by Paula Burch-Celentano)

 

A Tulane School of Architecture professor is being recognized for her impact as a national leader in architectural education.

Judith Kinnard, FAIA, professor of architecture and Harvey-Wadsworth Chair of Landscape Urbanism, was recently named a Distinguished Professor by the Association of Collegiate Schools of Architecture.  

The honor is given for “sustained creative achievement in the advancement of architectural education.”

“One of the interesting things about teaching studios in New Orleans is that although the city is unique, it has lessons that apply to most American cities.”

Judith Kinnard

Kinnard — an educator, designer and thought leader — has spent nearly 40 years inspiring architecture students, contributing to the field’s knowledge base and putting innovative ideas into practice in award-winning projects of her own.

“The profession of architecture has shifted dramatically in recent years, expanding beyond the limits of designing buildings and physical environments,” said Kinnard. “It is more and more challenging to package an education that is both broad enough to encompass multiple futures for our graduates and focused enough to give them real skills to enter the profession today and be prepared for what it will be 25 years from now.”

Kinnard is influencing this conversation at a national level as president of the National Architectural Accrediting Board. The organization’s accreditation process ensures schools of architecture are meeting core standards to prepare students for the field.  She is also a past president of the Association of Collegiate Schools of Architecture, which represents more than 200 schools of architecture and 5,000 faculty.

At Tulane, much of Kinnard’s teaching focuses on bringing students out of the classroom to understand and appreciate the places to which they will contribute as designers.

“One of the interesting things about teaching studios in New Orleans is that although the city is unique, it has lessons that apply to most American cities,” said Kinnard.

Tulane University alumna Dana Buntrock was among the four other Distinguished Professor Award recipients. The winners will be celebrated in March during ACSA’s annual meeting in Denver.