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Tulane preserves digital histories of LGBTQ activism in the South

November 17, 2017 2:30 PM
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Members of BreakOUT! celebrate during the annual Transgender March of Resilience in 2015. The image is one of many to be preserved within the Newcomb Archives. (Photo from Newcomb Archives)

 

Through the recent acquisition of records from the youth LGBTQ organization BreakOUT!, Newcomb Archives is preserving the group’s story of empowering the LGBTQ community in New Orleans.

BreakOUT! is also the first completely digital collection at Newcomb Archives and serves as a pilot collection for other digital-archiving initiatives.

Since BreakOUT!’s founding in 2011, it has been on the frontline of LGBTQ activism and the movement for equal rights for transgender youth of color. BreakOUT!’s contributions to mobilizing youth represent an integral part of Louisiana’s LGBTQ history. Newcomb Archives documents the history of women and gender in the Gulf South.

“All too often, trans history has been minimized or erased from the historical record.”

Chloe Raub, head of archives and special collections at Newcomb College Institute

The acquisition was also facilitated by the LGBT+ Archives Project of Louisiana, which promotes the protection and preservation of records and artifacts that document the state’s LGBTQ history and culture. The LGBT+ Archives Project is a partner of Tulane’s Center for Public Service.

“All too often, trans history has been minimized or erased from the historical record,” said Chloe Raub, head of archives and special collections at Newcomb College Institute. “When we met with BreakOUT! and the Archives Project to discuss acquiring the collection, we saw an opportunity to help change that. The BreakOUT! records are an incredibly rich collection, and vitally important in documenting the history of transgender activism in the South."

Both Newcomb Archives and BreakOUT! were honored for their collaboration at the Oracle Gala, an event sponsored by LGBT+ Archives Project, in November.

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