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Tulane School of Medicine launches immersion program for biotech execs and investors visiting the Big Easy

January 08, 2018 12:45 PM


Keith Brannon

Dr. Han Lim (right), academic partnerships executive at San Francisco-based biotech firm Atomwise meets with Dr. Hua Lu, chair of biochemistry and molecular biology at Tulane. Atomwise uses artificial intelligence to help discover new medicines. Photo by Ryan Rivet.


Tulane University School of Medicine has launched a new In-Residence Immersion Program that offers biotech executives, venture capitalists, scientists and entrepreneurs visiting New Orleans from across the country a fully functional on-the-go workspace on its downtown campus.

The program is an innovative way executives can have a temporary home base at Tulane steps away from the pioneering research happening in labs, clinics and classrooms throughout the health sciences campus in the heart of the city’s medical and biotech corridor.

“They are not just visiting. They have an opportunity to become immersed in the community,” said James Zanewicz, School of Medicine chief business officer. “We can arrange for them to meet with our scientists, tour our labs and learn more about our world-class faculty, extensive research portfolio and opportunities for collaboration.”

Tulane has a breadth of research, innovations and facility strengths across all stages of the research continuum - basic, applied, advanced and clinical. Research strengths at the School of Medicine include infectious disease, cardiovascular and related diseases, cancer, neuroscience, regenerative medicine, peptide chemistry and more. Tulane is also one of the only research universities with a medical school, school of public health and tropical medicine and a national primate research center.

Zanewicz says the new program will give biotech executives, investors and scientists from larger markets like Boston, San Francisco or San Diego an easy way to learn about the New Orleans research community and opportunities for partnerships. The program could be especially attractive for startups and entrepreneurs exploring lower-cost markets for operating clinical trials or relocation.

The space can be utilized as little as a day or as long as a few weeks, depending on demand, Zanewicz said.   

To request space or to learn more about the program, visit