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An Evening with Prospect.4 Artist Monique Verdin

Location: uptown campus
Building:Woldenberg Art Center


Monique Verdin is a daughter of southeast Louisiana's Houma Nation. The complex interconnectedness of environment, economics, culture, climate and change have inspired her to intimately document Houma relatives and their lifeways at the ends of the bayous, as they endure the realities of restoration and adaptation in the heart of America's Mississippi River Delta.



For more information contact Regina Cairns by phone at 504-314-2854

 


 

An Evening with Prospect.4 Artist Cauleen Smith and Composer Courtney Bryan

Location: uptown campus
Building:Woldenberg Art Center


Cauleen Smith is an interdisciplinary artist whose work reflects upon the everyday possibilities of the imagination. Operating in multiple materials and arenas, Smith roots her work firmly within the discourse of mid-twentieth- century experimental film.



For more information contact Regina Cairns by phone at 504-314-2854

 


 

Author to speak on the effects of mass incarceration

Dec 06, 2017
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A public reading and lecture with Fox Rich, a renowned author, mother of six sons and prison abolitionist will be held Tuesday, Dec. 12, on the uptown campus.

Rich will discuss...

Author and Abolitionist: A Conversation with Fox Rich

Location: uptown campus
Building:Rogers Memorial Chapel


 The New Orleans Center for the Gulf South welcomes Fox Rich to Tulane University. Rich is a Shreveport native, speaker, business owner, and author of The One That Got Away: A True Story of Personal Transformation. Facing 297 years in prison for her part in a botched robbery, she emerged from incarceration with a sense of purpose and mission: to restore her family and break the cycle of incarceration in Louisiana.



For more information contact Regina Cairns by phone at 504-314-2854

 


 

Tulane geographer to discuss formation of New Orleans’ neighborhoods

Nov 17, 2017
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Imagine a New Orleans without its most popular neighborhoods: no Garden District, no Central City, no Carrollton, no Algiers. For most familiar with the city’s geography, the task is...

Not So Friendly Neighbors: The Annexations of New Orleans

Location: uptown campus
Building:Woldenberg Art Center


The New Orleans Center for the Gulf South welcomes you to "Not So Friendly Neighbors: How New Orleans Annexed Lafayette, Jefferson, Algiers, and Carrollton, 1852-1874", a lecture by Richard Campanella.



For more information contact Regina Cairns by phone at 504-314-2854

 


 

Dread Scott: The Art of Resistance

Location: uptown campus
Building:Woldenberg Art Center, 205


The New Orleans Center for the Gulf South, in conjunction with Antenna Gallery and Tulane University's Office of Multicultural Affairs would like to invite you to experience performance artist and activist, Dread Scott. 



For more information contact Regina Cairns by phone at 504-314-2854

 


 

New Orleans Center for the Gulf South Open House

Location: uptown campus
Building:Newcomb Hall, 112


Come join The New Orleans Center for the Gulf South as we kick off Homecoming weekend with our Open House on November 3, 2017 from 3-5pm in Newcomb Hall 112. Learn more about the center and all of it's upcoming events and programs while enjoying great food, conversations with faculty and alumni, and even get a chance to win some great prizes through our raffle.



For more information contact Regina Cairns by phone at 504-314-2854

 


 

Author set to discuss the ‘Slave Trail of Tears’

Oct 05, 2017
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Author Edward Ball’s journey from the Deep South to the Gulf South traverses what he calls the “Slave Trail of Tears” — an enslaved African forced migration that dramatically changed the Gulf...

The Slave Trail of Tears

Location: uptown campus
Building:Woldenberg Art Center


During the fifty years before the Civil War (1820-60), close to one million people, enslaved African Americans, were pushed out of the Upper South (mainly from Virginia and Maryland) and forced to journey to the Deep South (Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama) to work on the cotton and sugar plantations newly laid out there. 

Edward Ball tells the story of this exodus, a migration twice as large as the wagon train journey that would carry half a million whites west, a movement twenty times bigger than the Native American "Trail of Tears" that led into Oklahoma.



For more information contact Regina Cairns by phone at 504-314-2854

 


 

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