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Shakespeare Festival goes beyond the big stage

January 31, 2017 12:30 PM
 | 
New Wave staff newwave@tulane.edu
  

 

 

Shakespeare’s work was never meant to be an elite form of art. In fact, he wrote for all of London’s citizens. To celebrate that, the New Orleans Shakespeare Festival at Tulane University will open its 24th season to the entire community taking shows to local shelters as well as a Louisiana prison.

“The festival is committed to presenting a diverse, exciting and accessible season to the Gulf South,” said Clare Moncrief, the festival’s managing director.

Emilie Whelan, co-artistic director of Cripple Creek Theatre Company, said, “We are honored to bring exquisite theater to new audiences that traditionally do not have accessibility to Shakespeare or theater at all.” Whelan is director of The Taming of the Shrew, the show being performed at the prison.

“The festival is committed to presenting a diverse, exciting and accessible season to the Gulf South.”

Clare Moncrief, the festival’s managing director

The festival is offering an early bird special on all ticket packages with a 10 percent discount now through March 31. Individual tickets go on sale April 1. Discounts are available for students, teachers, seniors and Tulane employees.

The festival runs June 2 through July 23 in the Lupin Theater on the uptown campus. All performances are at 7:30 p.m. except for 1:30 p.m. matinees on Sundays.

More details are available online.  

The 2017 season includes:

  • The Taming of the Shrew, in partnership with Cripple Creek Theatre Company, which runs June 2-18

  • The Tempest July 7-23

  • Two-night play reading series: Titus Andronicus on June 7 and Othello on July 12

  • Screening of Twelfth Night, recorded live at Shakespeare’s Globe Theatre in London on July 13

  • Collaboration with The NOLA Project, entitled By Any Scenes Necessary, will spoof Romeo & Juliet on July 19.

Related content: Shakespeare Festival’s future is bright