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Tulane experts chime in on Mardi Gras cleanup and a major Mayan discovery

February 16, 2018 3:45 PM
Carolyn Scofield




Tulane researchers talk about problems with all those Mardi Gras beads, and two Tulane archaeologists make a major Mayan discovery. That’s all part of News in Review.

Carnival season is over, but thousands of beads are still hanging around New Orleans. Tulane pharmacologist Howard Mielke talked to Newsweek and U.S. News & World Report about how kids can be exposed to lead from the beads. And Chris Dalbom, program manager for the Tulane Institute on Water Resources Law and Policy, told Seeker about the city’s effort to clear catch basins of trash, including all those discarded Mardi Gras throws.

The Cut interviewed director of Tulane’s Traumatology Institute, Charles Figley, about why we become desensitized to mass shootings.

Tulane geographer Richard Campanella had an article in The Atlantic about how humans sank New Orleans. He also talked to The Economist about the history of Bourbon Street. 

The Goldring Center for Culinary Medicine received two national mentions. U.S. News & World Report talked to Tulane physician Tim Harlan about the programs offered there and NPR featured the center in a story shared by affiliates around the country.

Dr. Marc Kahn of the Tulane School of Medicine co-authored a study that found medical students who make time for art are more empathetic and less likely to burnout. Science Daily, Artsy, IFL Science and Pacific Standard all talked to Dr. Kahn about his research.

Tulane’s Disaster Resilience Leadership Academy director Reggie Ferreira appeared live on CNN to talk about the water crisis in Cape Town.

The Thomas Reuters Foundation also interviewed Ferreira about the crisis in South Africa.

And Tulane archaeologists Marcello Canuto and Francisco Estrada-Belli recently helped uncover an ancient Mayan megalopolis in Guatemala. National Geographic broke the story, and our experts were quoted by the New York Times, PBS, TIME Magazine, Reuters, Newsweek and many more.

That’s all for Tulane News in Review. See you next time!