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Tulane Summer Enrichment Institute inspires future STEM careers

February 21, 2018 4:00 PM
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Designed to encourage students to pursue STEM careers, the new Tulane Summer Enrichment Institute will offer non-credit courses to middle school and high school students on campus. (Photo by Paula Burch-Celentano)

 

This summer, Tulane will introduce a new program designed to inspire the next generation of scientists, mathematicians and engineers. The Tulane Summer Enrichment Institute in STEM (TSEI) will offer non-credit courses to middle school and high school students on campus, providing a first look into university life in New Orleans.

Students who are rising sixth-12th graders can enroll in the institute’s weeklong day program or enter the two week residential program to experience living on a college campus.

“The institute’s overall goal is to create a more vibrant campus during the summer and to utilize Tulane’s academic and physical resources to bring new educational experiences to a broad range of students,” said Desiree Packard, executive director of strategic summer programs.

“The institute’s overall goal is to create a more vibrant campus during the summer and to utilize Tulane’s academic and physical resources to bring new educational experiences to students.”

— Desiree Packard, executive director of strategic summer programs

With eight sessions running from June 10-Aug. 4, TSEI’s programming will be offered alongside three other pre-college summer programs, including Career Explorations in Architecture, the Tulane Science Scholars Program and the Newcomb Summer Session.

Developed by Erica Smith, a professor of practice in the Teacher Preparation and Certification Program, TSEI’s curriculum covers an array of STEM disciplines, including environmental science, computer science, ecology and engineering. Organized into multiple tracks for different age groups, courses will focus on teaching complex concepts — like robotics, coding and app development — in a practical way.

Supportive Tulane faculty will also provide students with access to Tulane facilities.

“A lot of these kids will not get the chance to do a program like this in their high school. You can be interested in coding or biomedical engineering, but if your school doesn’t offer that particular subject, the likelihood of you getting an opportunity to study it is limited,” said Packard.

Packard added that the institute also provides the perfect summer activity for children of Tulane faculty and staff members, noting that university employees will receive a 10 percent discount off the program’s tuition.

“We have a day program, so kids can come during work hours. It’s a great option, since summer activities can be limited in the city after June,” said Packard.

To enroll in the TSEI, click here.