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Where are Amelia Earhart’s bones?

March 15, 2018 4:30 PM
 | 
Carolyn Scofield cscofiel@tulane.edu
  

 

 

Transcript:

Hi there, welcome to another edition of Tulane News in Review. Here’s a wrap up of the Tulanians making national headlines.

New Orleans chef Tunde Wey conducted a social experiment at his lunch counter to highlight racial wealth disparities. He enlisted the help of Tulane School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine student Anjali Prasertong to do an exit interview that would help him understand why people decide to pay what they chose. The story was picked up by the Washington Post, Newsweek, NPR and more than a dozen other news outlets around the country.

The deadly Lassa fever is spreading rapidly in Nigeria and VOX talked to Tulane epidemiologist and disease ecologist Lina Moses along with immunologist and microbiologist Bob Garry about the virus.  

Fisheries ecologist Hank Bart, who heads the Tulane University Biodiversity Research Institute, spoke with Mashable about sharks in the Chagos archipelago.

Mashable also interviewed Tulane biological anthropologist John Verano about the disappearance of Amelia Earhart’s bones.

The Chronicle of Higher Education featured Toni Weiss of Tulane’s Center for Engaged Learning and Teaching in a column about thoughtful approaches to student engagement and assessment.

Tulane psychologist Damian Murray talked to Wallet Hub for the website’s series on the happiest cities in America.

New Orleans City Business recognized a number of Tulanians, naming assistant provost for Title IX and Clery Compliance Meredith Smith as One to Watch and School of Medicine doctors Christoper DuCoin, Robert Hendel and Rebecca Schroll as Health Care Heroes. School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine epidemiologist Felicia Rabito was also recognized as a Health Care Hero.

Finally, recent Tulane grad Chyna Johnson joined nine other women to follow in the footsteps of abolitionist Harriet Tubman. The group walked from Maryland to Delaware on a 100-mile trek along the route of the Underground Railroad. Essence Magazine followed Johnson’s journey.

Thanks for watching Tulane News in Review. See you next time!