Tulane Statements

A Message from the President - December 11, 2023

Dear Tulane Community:

Antisemitism has no place at Tulane University. Bias, prejudice and discrimination are completely counter to our values and to the building of a world-class academic and research university with a positive institutional culture. As we witness an appalling and distressing rise in antisemitism on college campuses and across our nation, we must redouble efforts to protect our students, faculty and staff. 

This is particularly important given our legacy of serving as a welcoming home to so many diverse voices. Tulane was one of the first universities in the south to enroll Jewish students and today we are proud to host such a large Jewish population on a campus where Tulanians of all backgrounds – Muslim, Arab, Christian and more – are supported in their cultural and religious identities. We hope to serve as a model in confronting the current national and global climate of intolerance and hate.

Our efforts have been, and will always be, aimed at fighting all forms of discrimination and harassment, but there are moments when it is essential to name and emphasize certain fundamental elements of this work if they are to have the visibility and impact necessary for us to create the sort of community for which we strive. That is why this letter underscores, in particular, our forceful, crucial and unequivocal commitment to combatting antisemitism. 

To continue to ensure the rights and safety of all, we are maintaining the increased security actions announced last month while also providing resources and support for students, faculty and staff facing antisemitism or other forms of harassment and discrimination. We have and will continue to hold accountable anyone who engages in violence or behavior that violates university conduct policies for students, faculty and staff.

But our work must not stop here. As in the past, when acts of discrimination and violence have caused a reckoning both nationally and, on our campuses, we will continue to find unity and a path forward together. Through the permanent, university-wide President’s Commission that was launched in 2015 we have worked daily to create a more equitable and inclusive Tulane that is a welcoming and supportive home for all, especially for marginalized members of our community. This work, which has included combatting antisemitism at its core from the very beginning, is far from finished and will continue to be a major university-wide focus. But now an expanded and reinvigorated President’s Commission will also help to support, align and coordinate the efforts of the many other programs and departments which have long been committed to the fight against antisemitism.

Through the President’s Commission we already have the infrastructure in place to harness the expertise of our faculty, the vision of our senior leadership and the passion of our students and staff to holistically address the scourge of antisemitism and all manifestations of hate based on racial, religious, ethnic and other differences. The reimagined and expanded President’s Commission we are announcing today — the President’s Commission on Equity and Tulane Values – will serve as a center for our efforts to combat the current rise in antisemitism, racism, Islamophobia and other iterations of hate. The Commission will include the best and brightest minds at Tulane – faculty experts, top administrators and leaders of Hillel and other campus organizations. Co-Chaired by Michael Cunningham, associate provost for graduate studies and research, and Mollye Demosthenidy, dean of Newcomb-Tulane College, the Commission will represent both the undergraduate and graduate perspectives as it:

  • Embraces new leadership and an enhanced focus on educational programming. 
  • Expands initiatives such as the Antisemitism Awareness Week that was held in October and the Anti-Islamophobia Awareness Week planned for April 2-9, 2024.     
  • Takes antisemitism and other anti-hate measures, which are already part of Orientation, and expands them throughout the Tulane experience including during:  
    • Pre-matriculation
    • Orientation and Welcome Week
    • Convocation
    • TIDES classes
    • Spring Scholar Welcome 

In the upcoming spring semester, we will also coordinate with student leaders in the Tulane Undergraduate Assembly (TUA), the student governance body for undergraduates, as well as with faculty in the School of Liberal Arts and other schools to:

  • Foster constructive dialogue on issues such as the current conflict in the Middle East.   
  • Promote, safeguard and cultivate freedom of expression, speech and inquiry through TUA-organized workshops featuring faculty, staff and peer facilitators. 
  • Explore the university's philosophy and protocols regarding freedom of expression, freedom to demonstrate and freedom from disruption.  
  • Present skill-based seminars on how to lead productive dialogues across differences.  

Further details regarding these initiatives will be shared at the beginning of the spring semester along with other learning opportunities through which students can explore the history of the present conflict in the Middle East and the origins and antecedents of movements that have led to discrimination and violence against Jews, Muslims and other ethnic and religious groups. We will also continue meeting with student organizations throughout the spring semester to learn about their experiences regarding discrimination of any kind, as well as their ideas for combating it.

Tulane is a deeply relational culture that constantly seeks to foster understanding among its diverse community of students, faculty, researchers and staff. We know that we will not always agree, but we can learn, work and discover together in an environment that prioritizes safety, well-being and belonging and that moves our community and world forward. Tulane is committed to using its knowledge for good, its expertise for solving societal problems, its diversity for fostering unity and its innovation for creating a better tomorrow. There is no better time than now to put these commitments into practice – for New Orleans and the world. This is what a great research and academic university is all about. 

Michael A. Fitts, President
Robin Forman, Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs and Provost
Patrick Norton, Senior Vice President/Chief Operating Officer/Treasurer

Dear Tulane Community,

We want to make you aware of a march by a group unaffiliated with Tulane University planned for tomorrow (Thursday) afternoon. This is part of a national walkout demonstration at a large number of universities and businesses both locally and across the country. The outside group has indicated online that they plan to gather alongside Freret Street. 

This is not a Tulane-sanctioned event, and there have been no requests for a demonstration on campus. Tulane is private property, and non-affiliates will not be allowed on campus. 

Our top priority is the safety of our community. We are proud of Tulane’s united front against antisemitism, Islamophobia and racism. Many Tulanians have come together in the wake of the violent incident two weeks ago. 

As previously communicated, we have significantly stepped up our security presence on campus and will further increase these measures during this event. Per our policies, we will not allow any non-registered event to occur on our campus. To be clear, we will not tolerate violence or behavior from anyone that violates university conduct policies for our students, faculty, and staff.

Security measures

We are working closely with a coalition of federal, state, and local government agencies and law enforcement partners, including the U.S. Department of Homeland Security, the Louisiana State Police, and the New Orleans Police Department, to secure public property around campus that Tulane does not control. 
  • Barricades will be implemented to restrict access to campus. Extra security will be on-site from multiple law enforcement agencies, including officers on motorcycles and horseback. 
  • Freret Street will be closed to vehicular traffic. Anyone in the community who would like an alternate walking path to the Academic Quad, should travel along Newcomb Place in front of Howard-Tilton Memorial Library and cross over Freret Street to Law Road. Staff will be at Freret to assist with crossing. 

Accountability

In addition to these security measures, we will continue to hold accountable anyone
who breaks the law or community members who violate university policies. 
  • Any hate crime will be prosecuted to the full extent of the law. An additional felony hate crime arrest is forthcoming related to the protest near campus two weeks ago. This will be the fourth arrest associated with that event that occurred near campus. None of those arrested in connection with the protest are members of the Tulane community.
  • We fundamentally respect the right to protest. Free speech is foundational to our society and a bedrock tenet of universities. However, we will not tolerate disruption to our academic mission and campus operations, whether in a classroom, a lab, or another area on campus. 
  • As always, work and attendance rules remain in effect for everyone in the Tulane community. Classes and other university operations are expected to continue as normal. Individuals violating university policies will be held accountable. 

Support and Resources:

  • We have resources available for anyone affected by these events. If you have information on an incident in which you or someone you know has been harassed or targeted in any way, fill out a concerns report.
  • Students in need of support resources can call our Student Affairs Professional On-Call at 504-920-9900. Someone from the Office of Case Management & Victim Services will contact you directly and connect you to the resources you need, whether academic, counseling, or something more specific to your situation. In addition, the Counseling Center has great resources available. Even more support resources for students can be found here.
  • Faculty and staff in need of assistance can call 1-800-624-5544 or visit this website.

We recognize this is a challenging time for everyone. If you have additional questions or concerns, please email president@tulane.edu. We continue to stand against all forms of violence and hate, including antisemitism, Islamaphobia and racism. At Tulane, we will always uphold the right to debate and protest peacefully, but we will not – we repeat, not – tolerate violence, aggression, or incitement. A line was crossed two weeks ago, and we will do everything in our power to ensure it is not crossed again. 

As is true for universities and communities across the country, we still have much work to do to heal and unite our community. We are grateful to all of you for playing a critical role in that endeavor. Our heightened security measures are not meant to thwart free expression and peaceful debate. Rather they are designed to protect our campus community and all peaceful demonstrators. These measures are part of our continued support for all students, faculty and staff, especially those who have deep cultural and religious ties to Israel and Gaza. We must continue to come together as a Tulane family to support one another as we reaffirm our unequivocal stand against antisemitism, Islamophobia and racism. 

Michael A. Fitts, President
Robin Forman, Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs and Provost
Patrick Norton, Senior Vice President/Chief Operating Officer/Treasurer

Dear Tulane Community:

We are writing to follow up on our message about yesterday’s protest.

To reiterate: the security and well-being of the Tulane community is our top priority. Protecting all our students, faculty, and staff is a daily and ongoing commitment.

We fully recognize that our community was deeply affected by yesterday’s violence and that we must ensure it does not happen again. This was a serious and deeply troubling moment for all Tulanians, and we will respond accordingly.

To be clear, there are no active threats and campus is secure.

Given this incident and the challenges we’ve seen at other universities across the country in recent days, we want to be thoroughly prepared. We are taking the following steps effective immediately:

Enhance security measures

You will notice a significantly increased security presence around our campuses.

The Tulane University Police Department (TUPD) is:

  • Increasing the number of officers on the ground.
  • Increasing the visibility of officers.
  • Expanding the number of patrols.
  • Maintaining a stepped-up presence in residence halls.
  • Continuing police escorts within campus geography for students, faculty, and staff.
  • Increasing TUPD patrols and presence in areas frequented by students on and off campus.
  • Restricting vehicular traffic on streets as needed.
  • Adding additional Allied Security personnel around the clock.

The several individuals who have been arrested in the last few days have been issued a restricted presence by TUPD, which prevents them from entering and engaging on any of Tulane’s campuses.

In addition, we have activated the Tulane Campus Safety Task Force, a cross-section of university departments charged with ensuring that Tulane’s efforts to keep our community safe are aligned and proactively communicated. This task force is similar to the one we established to monitor, plan, and respond during Covid.

The Campus Safety Task Force is adding additional measures should any other protests be planned:

  • Implement a more robust security response in concert with the New Orleans Police Department, Louisiana State Police, and other law enforcement agencies. This plan will feature a highly visible police presence at any rally or protest.
  • Work with the City of New Orleans and other partners to secure public property around campus that Tulane does not control if needed.
  • Use barriers between campus and public areas where protests may happen, and to keep demonstrators and counter-demonstrators away from each other.
  • Ensure that our community can cross our uptown campus at Freret Street without disruption.
  • Reach out to impacted university organizations to ensure their needs are being met as we support them during these challenging times.

Conduct enforcement

Tulane will continue to enforce the Student Code of Conduct and the staff and faculty handbooks. Any member of our community found violating these policies will face appropriate disciplinary action. The outcomes of any disciplinary proceedings are confidential.

Providing support resources and responding to complaints

We have resources available for anyone affected by these events. If you have information on an incident in which you or someone you know has been harassed or targeted in any way, fill out a concerns report.

Students in need of support resources can call our Student Affairs Professional On-Call at 504-920-9900. Someone from the Office of Case Management & Victim Services will contact you directly and connect you to the resources you need, whether academic, counseling, or something more specific to your situation. In addition, the Counseling Center has great resources available. Even more support resources for students can be found here.

Faculty and staff in need of assistance can call 1-800-624-5544 or visit this website.

We are engaged in continued conversations with the Office of Student Affairs, The Carolyn Barber Pierre Center for Intercultural Life, the Office of Equity, Diversity and Inclusion, as well as Jewish and Muslim student associations and religious organizations to learn how to best support our students who have family, friends or deep religious and cultural ties to Israel or Gaza.

We must unite in our efforts to protect one another and to stand against all forms of violence and hate including antisemitism, Islamophobia, and racism.

To reiterate: there are no active threats and campus is secure, but we want to be prepared. We thank you for your commitment and partnership in helping to keep our community safe.

Michael A. Fitts, President
Robin Forman, Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs and Provost
Patrick Norton, Senior Vice President/Chief Operating Officer/Treasurer

Dear Tulane Community:

Today was a deeply distressing day at Tulane University.

Three Tulane students were assaulted at a rally intentionally staged on the public sidewalk along Freret Street, over which we do not have control. This rally was not approved or sanctioned by Tulane. There were approximately 40 plainclothes and uniformed New Orleans, Tulane, Loyola and State Police officers, including mounted police, who made several arrests. There were also dozens of Tulane staff members on hand to support students. TUPD also apprehended a suspect last night for an act of antisemitic vandalism (graffiti) to a building near campus.

The investigation into today’s incident continues and additional arrests may be forthcoming as video evidence is reviewed. Campus is secure.

To be clear: We condemn and are outraged by today’s violence and the hateful language and rhetoric we heard. It is counter to everything we stand for at Tulane. What started out as a peaceful demonstration unfortunately devolved into a violent incident and a dark day for our community.

We are continuing to increase security on campus and assisting our students in any way we can. We are also actively preparing for any additional demonstrations and activity. We will be encouraging students to avoid participating in any further demonstrations off campus given the involvement of outside disruptors and the possibility of escalation.

At today’s rally, the actions of some of the protestors, many of whom were not affiliated with Tulane, were violent, deplorable, deliberately provocative and exploitative of the profound sorrow and anger so many of us have been experiencing over the last few weeks. They were also completely counter to Tulane’s values of practicing mutual respect when debating ideas and promoting viewpoints, especially with those with whom we disagree the most.

We want to underscore that this rally was not sanctioned by Tulane University and was not approved in any way by our university. It was staged on public property and attended by many who were not affiliated with our university. However, everyone who committed an illegal act on this day will be held accountable for their actions. In addition, all students are accountable to the Code of Student Conduct.

Tulane has always found strength in our unity. We must now lean on our common humanity and the Tulane spirit to find a path forward during these challenging times. Symbols and acts of hatred, antisemitism, deliberate provocation and preying upon the fears of others are not part of who we are. We cannot prevent protests from happening on public property even at our university’s doorstep. We can only protect and support one another as we face each new day together.

If you have information on an incident in which you or someone you know has been harassed or targeted in any way, fill out a concerns report or call our Student Affairs Professional On-Call at 504-920-9900. Someone from the Office of Case Management & Victim Services will contact you directly and connect you to the resources you need, whether academic, counseling or something more specific to your situation. Faculty and staff in need of assistance can call 1-800-624-5544.

There’s nothing more important than supporting our community at this moment in time.

Michael A. Fitts, President
Robin Forman, Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs and Provost
Patrick Norton, Senior Vice President/Chief Operating Officer/Treasurer

Dear Tulane Community:

I write to you today about the horrific terrorist attacks by Hamas and their aftermath.

I have spoken with many in the Tulane community this week who are scared, angry and in pain. Please know that I share your agony, shock and distress at this unprecedented violence.

I unequivocally condemn the attacks by Hamas on Israel and all forms of terrorism and hate. I was deeply affected by these heinous acts, as were so many Tulanians. My thoughts remain with the Jewish community in the wake of these attacks. I grieve with them and all who were shocked, angered and appalled by these atrocities and unimaginable brutality.

We’re ready to support all Tulanians who have family, friends or cultural and religious ties to Israel and Gaza. As the war rages on, we’re witnessing a tragic loss of innocent civilian lives, both Israeli and Palestinian.

Thankfully, our students studying in Israel this semester are all safe. We will continue to assist these students, as well as students from every area affected by this war. We have stepped up security to ensure the safety and well-being of our campus community. Please remember that you are not alone and we are here to help. We have resources available to any community member affected by these deeply distressing events. Help is available for students at 504-920-9900 and for faculty and staff at 1-800-624-5544.

In times like these, I’m reminded that what I love about Tulane is our caring and supportive culture. In the upcoming days and weeks, there will be many opportunities around our campus for us to gather as a community in support of one another. I urge you to take advantage of these, as well as the day-to-day moments that allow us to strengthen our bonds, express our compassion, and hope and pray for a more peaceful future.

Michael A. Fitts, President

The violence and loss of life over the last few days in the Middle East have been heartbreaking. We are grieving over the truly horrific attacks by Hamas on Israel, and the ongoing violence in Israel and Gaza. We want to acknowledge the deep pain and suffering this is causing many members of our community, and our thoughts go out to all members of the Tulane community and beyond who have loved ones impacted by this war.

Tulane continues to focus on supporting our community both abroad and on campus. Staff members in Student Affairs and the Center for Global Education have been in touch with students studying in Israel this semester and have confirmed that they are all safe. We will continue to assist these students, as well as students on campus with family and friends in all the areas affected by this war.

As a global academic and research community, we encourage Tulanians to reach out and support one another, while being especially mindful and available to those with family and friends or cultural and religious ties in the areas impacted by the ongoing violence.

Resources are available to all community members affected by these deeply troubling events. Students seeking help can call 504-264-6074. Employees can call 1-800-624-5544.

Michael A. Fitts, President
Robin Forman, Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs and Provost

Although Tulane improved in most of the indicators measured in last year’s U.S. News rankings and experienced, at most, very small declines in the others, we, like many top private universities, fell significantly in the latest U.S. News survey that was released today. The reason for this precipitous drop is U.S. News’ decision to suddenly and radically alter its methodology for assessing the quality of universities.
 
By almost any standard we are a better and stronger institution now than we have ever been. The academic quality and diversity of our students have never been higher, and over the past several years we have seen one of the nation’s largest jumps in yield and selectivity. We have also dramatically increased need-based financial aid, making a Tulane education more affordable to the most talented students from all economic backgrounds. In addition, we continue to have one of the lowest student-to-faculty ratios in the country.
 
The scale and impact of our research is also breaking records. For example, this past year, we garnered the highest level of external grant funding in Tulane’s history, an increase of about 70% over the past six years, which reflects one of the most dramatic expansions in research funding in all of higher education. Our faculty are also being awarded national honors at an unprecedented rate.
  
So why the significant change? This year’s rankings heavily favor and reward universities for their ability to enroll classes with a high number of first-generation and economically disadvantaged students and further this mission through less stringent admission requirements. We applaud this focus on socio-economic mobility but believe that these new rankings, while potentially valuable for some purposes, are less relevant for most students who are seeking information about where they will find the most engaging and rewarding academic experience.  
 
This year’s rankings also reduced the weight placed on, or threw out entirely, whole categories of criteria that U.S. News highly valued as recently as a year ago – including the academic quality of students, the academic qualifications of the faculty, the number of small classes offered, and the level of financial resources devoted to students and faculty. Again, by these and almost every other measure previously considered or heavily weighted by U.S. News, we perform exceptionally well. But that is not reflected in these rankings since they measure different things, and measure them differently, than they did just a year ago.

We also believe U.S. News made a serious and consequential error in measuring the financial success of our students and the graduation rates of our students who are first-generation, a new ranking criterion. U.S. News based those indicators on publicly available data that only included undergraduates who took out federal student loans, which is a minority of Tulane students. Additionally, these data combine information about full-time students enrolled in Newcomb-Tulane College (NTC) with data about our students enrolled in the School of Professional Advancement (SOPA), a separate undergraduate school for part-time students who are often working adults. All of Tulane’s other student-based indicators used in the rankings, however, are based solely on NTC data. It is also worth noting that this data relates to students who graduated as long as a decade ago. We have reached out to U.S. News regarding this huge discrepancy and are awaiting their response.

This latest iteration of U.S. News’ annual exercise highlights the shortcomings of attempting to numerically rank universities with vastly different missions, sizes, locations, and student populations. Students should be cautious about using a one-size-fits-all ranking to help determine where they’ll attend college.

Michael A. Fitts, President
Robin Forman, Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs and Provost

A truly great university is defined by breakthrough discovery, world-class scholarship and transformative personal growth and enrichment.

Following the decision announced by the U.S. Supreme Court earlier today, we write to you to reaffirm the university’s commitment to diversity as an essential element of our commitment to excellence. Tulane must be an equitable, diverse and inclusive community that welcomes and supports a wide array of students, faculty and staff. The transformative value derived from a diverse university community enriches, energizes and informs our research, discovery and teaching in ways that benefit everyone.

Over the last several years, we have made great strides in fostering an environment where each member of our academic community can thrive. And we have much more work to do together.

We have been preparing for today’s U.S. Supreme Court ruling with this commitment in mind. Now that the decision has been announced, we will be reviewing changes we may need to make to ensure we are achieving our goals of diversity and inclusivity to the fullest extent permitted by law. A working group, which is comprised of a wide array of experts from across the university has been meeting regularly. Their efforts will inform our practices to ensure we continue to attract the best and brightest students.

We know the best research and learning occurs on a campus that reflects our multicultural world, which in turn has the most positive impact on improving our society. We will continue to welcome and support students, faculty and staff from the widest range of cultural and educational backgrounds.

Michael A. Fitts, President
Robin Forman, Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs and Provost

We are deeply concerned by the potential impacts on the Tulane community of several bills under consideration in the Louisiana Legislature targeting land ownership by non-U.S. citizens. We continue to share our concerns with legislators. These bills have made many of our faculty and students uncertain and anxious about their futures in our state, and we share those concerns. Universities thrive on their ability to foster a welcoming and safe community where we can recruit and retain the best and the brightest faculty, staff, and students from around the world to learn, research, and work together to solve our most pressing challenges. Our international community plays a crucial role in the research and innovation ecosystem of our city and state. These international scholars and students have contributed greatly to the extraordinary success Tulane has experienced in research and in helping to increase economic growth in our region. It is essential that we recognize and appreciate their contributions to our state, our universities, and our neighborhoods.

Michael A. Fitts, President
Robin Forman, Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs and Provost

The message below was sent to the Tulane community on September 1, 2022.

Dear Tulane Community:

At Tulane University, we aim to support and engage one another with understanding and compassion. Tulane attracts students from all over the country, where there are a variety of different laws on abortion. We also are a university and a community composed of students, faculty, and staff with differing, strongly held, and deeply personal beliefs on this issue. The Supreme Court’s recent overturning of the 50-year-old Roe v. Wade decision that legalized abortion has caused great distress for many in our community. We have also heard from many Tulanians who support the court’s ruling.

We write to you today to reiterate the commitments made in university-wide messages that were sent the day the SCOTUS decision was announced. While as an institution, Tulane does not take a position on issues such as this, we understand its importance and impact and pledge to support our community’s healthcare needs, including those involving reproductive health, to the fullest extent allowed by law.

This includes offering counseling to all members of our student body and community regarding all of their healthcare options and supporting their decisions regarding those options. It also includes providing information, counseling and assistance to pregnant community members. In addition, the university will offer free contraception, including emergency contraception and pregnancy tests at various locations on our campuses.

Tulane is also committed to ensuring equal access to academic programs and extracurricular activities to students who might be, are, or have been pregnant. Case Management and Victim Support Services (CMVSS) assists students seeking benefits, services, or leave related to pregnancy or other reproductive care. Reproductive healthcare is also part of the comprehensive insurance we provide for students, faculty and staff.

To ensure that the university is most effective in our efforts, two university-wide working groups were formed and are meeting regularly. The groups, which include experts from Campus Health, Sexual Violence Prevention and Response, Human Resources, Government Affairs and other relevant offices and departments, are advising senior leaders on operations to better serve our community. Their work, which is vital to our commitment to serving our community’s healthcare needs, while respecting all Tulanians and their viewpoints on this issue, will continue for the foreseeable future.

Michael A. Fitts, President
Robin Forman, Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs and Provost


 

The messages below were sent to the Tulane community on June 24, 2022, following the decision by U.S. Supreme Court to overturn Roe v. Wade.

Dear Students:

As you know, the U.S. Supreme Court has issued a ruling overturning the landmark Roe v. Wade decision that legalized abortion in this country. This represents perhaps one of the most consequential and contentious rulings in our lifetime. As a result of this decision, Louisiana has enacted a state law banning abortions except in instances where the mother’s life is at risk or the fetus is “medically futile,” including an ectopic pregnancy.

Ahead of this formal ruling, we convened two working groups comprised of subject matter experts from Campus Health, Sexual Violence Prevention and Response, Human Resources, Government Affairs and other offices and departments that are both student and employee-focused. These working groups have been endeavoring to understand the ruling’s impacts and what changes we will need to make in response.

Although their work is ongoing, please know that Tulane will continue to support the university community’s healthcare needs, including those involving reproductive health, to the fullest extent allowed by law. We also will continue to provide counseling and support to community members whether they choose to terminate their pregnancy or bring their pregnancy to term.

We recognize abortion is one of the most divisive issues of our time, and members of the Tulane community have passionate, deeply held opinions and convictions on this matter. Tulane encourages the free exchange of ideas and opinions on issues such as this with respect for a wide array of different perspectives.

We also know that this decision is deeply troubling for many in our community. Any student who needs support managing these issues, or has questions about available reproductive health services, is encouraged to schedule an appointment with Campus Health. All conversations with healthcare providers are confidential. Regardless of their views on this issue, students who need support managing the stresses associated with the way this issue is impacting campus life may contact Case Management & Victim Services at 504-314-2160 during normal business hours, or the Student Affairs Professional On-Call at 504-920-9900 after hours and on weekends. Students seeking confidential support may contact the Counseling Center during normal business hours at 504-314-2277 or The Line after hours and on weekends at 504-264-6074.

Please know that we are deeply committed to supporting our community and helping individuals navigate issues that may arise for them personally or collectively as a result of this ruling.

Erica Woodley
Dean of Students


 

Dear Faculty and Staff,

As you know, the U.S. Supreme Court has issued a ruling overturning the landmark Roe v. Wade decision that legalized abortion in this country. This represents perhaps one of the most consequential and contentious rulings in our lifetime. As a result of this decision, Louisiana has enacted a state law banning abortions except in instances where the mother’s life is at risk or the fetus is “medically futile,” including an ectopic pregnancy.

Ahead of this formal ruling, we convened two working groups comprised of subject matter experts from Campus Health, Sexual Violence Prevention and Response, Human Resources, Government Affairs and other offices and departments that are both student and employee-focused. These working groups have been endeavoring to understand the ruling’s impacts and what changes we will need to make in response.

Although their work is ongoing, please know that Tulane will continue to support the university community’s healthcare needs, including those involving reproductive health, to the fullest extent allowable by law. We also will continue to provide counseling and support to community members whether they choose to terminate their pregnancy or bring their pregnancy to term.

We recognize abortion is one of the most divisive issues of our time, and members of the Tulane community have passionate, deeply held opinions and convictions on this matter. Tulane encourages the free exchange of ideas and opinions on issues such as this with respect for a wide array of different perspectives.

We also know that this decision is deeply troubling for many in our community. Regardless of their views on this subject, any staff member who needs support managing these issues is encouraged to schedule an appointment with Employee Assistance Program, which is available for all employees 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. Services, which are free of charge and completely confidential, can be accessed by calling 1-800-624-5544 or visit the website at www.ndbh.com, company code: Tulane.

Please know that we are deeply committed to supporting our community and helping individuals navigate issues that may arise for them personally or collectively as a result of this ruling.

Jonathan Small
Vice President of Human Resources and Institutional Equity

Remembering the Value of BIPOC Lives and Deepening our Racial Healing: A Tulane Community Gathering May 18, 2022 | 4:00 - 5:00 pm

Join us as a community as we grieve the lives lost to racist and nationalist murders in Buffalo, NY and Laguna Woods, CA this past weekend. We know our Tulane community is hurting right now on many levels, and we want to have a space to gather to remember the value of BIPOC lives and how we can counter white supremacy that drives anti-Blackness, anti-Semitism, heterosexism, and so many other intersectional hatreds. In our space, we will come together to grieve and remember the importance of taking action as community members to work for justice. Featured speakers are: Dr. Jinaki Flint (Counseling and Psychological Services), Carolyn Barber-Pierre (Student Affairs), Anneliese Singh (EDI Office), and more.

Our hearts and prayers are with the people of Ukraine and the region as they confront the continued tragedy and brutality of war. More than ever, we need to support one another, especially those with family and friends in Ukraine and other areas affected by the ongoing violence.

We also offer resources to those who need to speak to someone during this time. If you are a student, you may call The Line, a 24/7 confidential counseling phone service, at 504-264-6074. Students can also reach a Student Affairs Professional On-Call at 504-920-9900 in the case of an emergency. For in-person service, students may go to CAPS for Counseling Services (located on the ground floor of the Diboll Parking Garage) or Case Management and Victim Support Services (located in the LBC, G02) from 8:30 a.m. to 7 p.m., Monday-Thursday and 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Friday. The Employee Assistance Program is available for all employees 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. Services, which are free of charge and completely confidential, can be accessed by calling 1-800-624-5544 or visit the website at www.ndbh.com, company code: Tulane.