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Gift establishes Oliver and Carroll Dabezies Endowed Chair at Tulane School of Medicine

September 08, 2020 2:45 PM
 | 
Carolyn Scofield cscofiel@tulane.edu
  
The Oliver and Carroll Dabezies Endowed Chair at Tulane School of Medicine will be established through a gift from their daughter, Elizabeth Dabezies Goodyear, and Charles W. Goodyear. Dr. Oliver Dabezies (above right) was an alumnus of and longtime clinical professor at the School of Medicine; his wife, Carroll (above left), was supportive throughout his career. (Photo provided by the Goodyear/Dabezies family)

 

A graduate and longtime clinical professor at Tulane University School of Medicine and his wife will be honored with a new endowed chair bearing their names. The Oliver and Carroll Dabezies Endowed Chair at Tulane School of Medicine will be established through a gift from Elizabeth Dabezies Goodyear and Charles W. Goodyear. The Oliver and Carroll Dabezies Chair will be held by the chairperson of the Department of Ophthalmology and will provide support for the chairperson's work in clinical practice, research, professional development or service.

“Dr. Dabezies lived a life devoted to service and family,” Tulane President Michael Fitts said. “This generous gift from Elizabeth Dabezies Goodyear and Charles W. Goodyear will ensure that the impact of Dr. Dabezies' work as an internationally known leader in the field of ophthalmology continues through future generations.”

“I have long wanted to do something that recognized my father’s contributions to the field of ophthalmology and specifically at Tulane,” said Elizabeth Goodyear. “I also wanted to honor my mother’s important supportive role in my father’s tremendous success in his academic work. With inspiration from my uncle, Eugene Dabezies, we decided that the best way to honor both of my parents was through this endowed chair at Tulane.”

“Dr. Dabezies had a tremendous impact on the future of eye health here in New Orleans, across the country and around the world.”

Dean Lee Hamm, MD

“My brother was dedicated to his family, his career in ophthalmology and was a fine member of the New Orleans community,” said Dr. Eugene Dabezies (A&S ’57, M ’60). “Honoring Oliver’s contributions with Carroll’s partnership in this way would have been so meaningful to them.”

Dr. Oliver Dabezies received his undergraduate degree from Tulane in 1951 and his medical degree in 1954 and completed his residency at Tulane in 1958. Post-residency, he spent two years in the U.S. Army Medical Corps as a captain and director of the Resident Education Program at Walter Reed National Medical Center in Bethesda, Maryland. He returned to New Orleans in 1960 and taught in the Department of Ophthalmology until his retirement in 1999.

Dr. Dabezies was recognized for his leadership roles in national organizations and was one of the pioneers in the development and use of contact lenses. Among his other achievements, Dr. Dabezies served as a founding member and president of the Contact Lens Association of Ophthalmologists (CLAO), served as its executive vice president for 11 years and authored its textbook on contact lenses. Through his association with CLAO, he became involved with the American National Standards Institute and chaired the group that formulated standards for contact lens solutions. He also created the International Contact Lens Society of Ophthalmologists.

He served on the board and was vice president of the American Academy of Ophthalmology and was secretary of the American Medical Association Ophthalmology section. He was a widely published writer and editor, held four active hospital affiliations, was a member of 11 medical societies, a lecturer at national and international meetings, and maintained a busy practice.

Dr. Dabezies helped to establish the Southern Eye Bank, serving on the board for 42 years and was president at the time of his death. He was the first recipient of the Eye Bank Distinguished Service Award. Dr. Dabezies was President of the Tulane Medical Alumni Association from 1991-1992, received Tulane Medical School’s Distinguished Service Award in 1994 and was named Tulane Alumni Association’s Outstanding Alumnus in 1994.
 
“Dr. Dabezies had a tremendous impact on the future of eye health here in New Orleans, across the country and around the world,” said Dr. Lee Hamm, dean of Tulane University School of Medicine. “This endowed chair will further his legacy in education and outreach.”