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Lisa Jackson, recipient of 2019 Tulane Distinguished Alumni Award, acts on making the world better

April 25, 2019 11:30 AM
 | 
Mary Ann Travis mtravis@tulane.edu
  

Darryl D. Berger, recipient of the Dermot McGlinchey Lifetime Achievement Award, joins Lisa Jackson, 2019 Distinguished Alumni Award recipient, and Tulane President Mike Fitts at this year’s Alumni Awards ceremony. (Photo by Guillermo Rojas)

 

Protecting the planet is what Lisa Jackson said she is most passionate about.

Jackson is vice president for environment, policy and social initiatives at Apple, the American multinational technology company headquartered in Cupertino, California. Apple is known for its computer hardware, software and electronic communication devices.

On April 6, Jackson, who earned a Bachelor of Science in Engineering from Tulane in 1983, received Tulane’s Distinguished Alumni Award at a ceremony at The World War II Museum.

“Education is still the great equalizer for citizens around the globe. The ability to access quality education, like we are so privileged to get as Tulane students and alumni, is not a given.”

Lisa Jackson

Six years ago, when Jackson moved to Apple after serving as administrator of the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency from 2009 to 2013, she said she brought “realistic but very ambitious” green innovations to the table.

Today, she proudly reports that Apple is “100 percent renewable power” in its 506 stores and 340 offices in 43 countries. Her goal is to expand clean energy initiatives along the supply chain of small businesses that partner with Apple. Also, she’s spending a lot of time and effort on the idea of a “circular economy,” so that eventually Apple products like new iPhones are made from materials salvaged from old products.

While climate change and clean energy are “mission No. 1” for her at Apple, Jackson also oversees the company’s community education programs.

“Education is still the great equalizer for citizens around the globe,” she said. “The ability to access quality education, like we are so privileged to get as Tulane students and alumni, is not a given.”

As a member of the Tulane Board and the School of Science and Engineering Board of Advisors, Jackson said that she loves the continuing ambition of the public service graduation requirement at Tulane.

“To me, the service requirement is a major life skill that you shouldn’t be allowed to graduate without having.”