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Physically distant but virtually connected, the Newcomb Art Museum reaches out

April 01, 2020 12:45 PM
 | 
Mary Ann Travis mtravis@tulane.edu
  
‘Be Your Ancestors’ Dream’ is among the coloring pages that can be downloaded for art activities from the Newcomb Art Museum’s website as part of the #MuseumFromHome effort. The line-drawing image is by Brandon ‘BMike’ Odums, a New Orleans-based visual artist whose work intersects art and resistance.

 

 

 

It’s not possible right now to visit in person the current Brandon “BMike” Odums “NOT SUPPOSED 2-BE HERE” exhibition at the Newcomb Art Museum. But the museum is reaching out with digital content to stay connected and sustained with Odums’ and others’ inspiring art.

“At Newcomb Art Museum we are creating relevant, engaging and uplifting content specifically designed as a resource for faculty, staff, students and our broader community.”

Mónica Ramírez-Montagut, director of the Newcomb Art Museum

 

Weekly, through an e-newsletter and daily, via its social media channels, the museum is providing art activities, behind-the-scenes tours, fun facts about Newcomb Pottery and more, including Studio BE coloring pages, created by Odums. 
 

During this time of COVID-19–imposed social distancing, the museum joined the #MuseumFromHome movement of artists and art organizations from around the world to “collectively come together to practice physical distancing but stay socially connected through creative means.”

 

According to the first e-newsletter, “Our goal throughout this time is to raise your spirit ... engage with art ... activate your mind ... help you stay informed ... and share content that makes us all smile.”

 

Visitors who poke around in the virtual offerings can find interviews with artists and musical performances, including fascinating content related to “Per(Sister): Incarcerated Women of Louisiana,” a 2019 groundbreaking effort through which both visual artists and musicians tell the stories of formerly incarcerated women in the New Orleans region.

 

Along with interactive content and information about the museum’s permanent collections and recent shows, the e-newsletter reports on the current coronavirus crisis, including a story about how the museum donated masks and gloves used for collections care to the medical community in need. 

 

Mónica Ramírez-Montagut, the museum’s director, said, "At Newcomb Art Museum we are creating relevant, engaging and uplifting content specifically designed as a resource for faculty, staff, students and our broader community, [such as] families, alumni, artists, creatives. 

 

“We hope the stories featured in our social media, digital platforms and e-newsletter serve as a cultural network and keep together the Tulane family through this unprecedented times, proudly reminding us all of the great resources, cultural assets and personal talents we find in our university and resilient city."